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Nursing Care

Pressure Ulcers

What are we measuring?

The percent of patients with Stage II & Above hospital-acquired pressure ulcers on medical units and medical-surgical units.

Note: Hospitals use different ways to calculate rates. We calculate the rate of pressure ulcers by screening all eligible patients in the medical center for the presence of pressure ulcers once every quarter for one day.

Why is this important?

A pressure ulcer (or skin breakdown) is a sore caused by pressure that causes damage to the underlying tissue. Patients who develop pressure ulcers while in the hospital are at greater risk for other medical problems, including infection, and can stay in the hospital longer than otherwise expected. Pressure ulcers are also called decubitus ulcers or bed sores.

What is our most recent performance and trend?

 

Source of Massachusetts comparison data is PatientCareLink

The 2014 goal for BIDMC is based on a review of a nationally recognized database of comparable institutions.

Medical Units: care for adult patients admitted to medical services, such as internal medicine, family practice, or cardiology. This may include such specialties as Bone Marrow Transplant, Cardiac, Gastrointestinal, Infectious Disease, Neurology, Oncology, Renal or Respiratory Medical units.

Source of Massachusetts comparison data is PatientCareLink

The 2014 goal for BIDMC is based on a review of a nationally recognized database of comparable institutions.

Medical-Surgical Units: care for adult patients admitted to surgical services such as general surgery, neurosurgery or orthopedics. This may include such specialties as Bariatric, Cardiothoracic, Gynecology, Neurosurgery, Orthopedic, Plastic Surgery, Transplant, or Trauma Surgery.

What are doing to improve our performance?

BIDMC has implemented a hospital-wide wound prevention team. We have revised our tool to assess patients for their risk of developing a pressure ulcer and put in place wound prevention interventions. Nursing staff assess a patient's risk for skin breakdown daily to account for the patient's changing condition and staff education about prevention is ongoing throughout the hospital.

Falls

What are we measuring?

The rate of falls experienced by patients on the medical units and medical-surgical units.

Note: Hospitals use different ways to calculate rates. At BIDMC our fall rate is calculated based on 1000 patient days.

Why is this important?

Patient falls that occur in the hospital can result in serious injury for many patients. 

What is our most recent performance and trend?

 

Source for Massachusetts comparison data is PatientCareLink

The 2014 goal for BIDMC is based on a review of a nationally recognized database of comparable institutions.  

Medical Units: care for adult patients admitted to medical services, such as internal medicine, family practice, or cardiology. This may include such specialties as Bone Marrow Transplant, Cardiac, Gastrointestinal, Infectious Disease, Neurology, Oncology, Renal or Respiratory Medical units.

 

Source for Massachusetts comparison data is PatientCareLink

The 2014 goal for BIDMC is based on a review of a nationally recognized database of comparable institutions.

Medical-Surgical Units: care for adult patients admitted to surgical services such as general surgery, neurosurgery or orthopedics. This may include such specialties as Bariatric, Cardiothoracic, Gynecology, Neurosurgery, Orthopedic, Plastic Surgery, Transplant, or Trauma Surgery.

What are we doing to improve our performance?

BIDMC has implemented a hospital-wide fall prevention team, revised our tool to assess patients for their risk of falling and put in place fall prevention interventions. Some of these initiatives include low beds, chair alarms, activity kits, and Global Risk Assessment and Careplan for Elders (GRACE) for early recognition of delirium. Nursing staff assess a patient's fall risk daily to account for the patient's changing condition and staff education about fall prevention is ongoing throughout the hospital. In addition, patients are visited by nursing staff at a minimum of every hour in a proactive approach to respond to patient needs, including toileting which we know can be a time for a heightened risk for fall. Through education and interventions, our fall with injury rate continues to decrease over time.

Other Publicly Reported Measures:

Last updated: September 2014

Contact Information

Silverman Institute for Health Care Quality and Safety
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center
330 Brookline Ave
Boston, MA 02215
617-667-1325