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Broccoli Compound May Help Radiation Damage

Posted 10/22/2013

Posted in

  I kind of love this although it is, in truth, a rather arcane finding with uncertain clinical value. Roger Lange, a very beloved man, was my friend and an esteemed medical oncologist at BIDMC and at Mt Auburn Hospital for decades. He died in January 2012 and is still missed daily; I continue to think that I "see" him in our hallways, especially around noon as he, trench coat over his white doctor coat, briefcase in hand, headed for the elevator and his "second job" at MAH.

  When asked my his breast cancer patients who were done with treatment and doing well, what could they do to promote good and lasting health, his answer (with a grin) was always: "Eat broccoli." I eat it a lot, always have because I like it, and I always think of him when I do.

  Anyhow, this study from the Georgetown Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, as reported in the Huff Post, suggests that a compound made from broccoli, DIM, may protect healthy tissue from radiation damage during treatment. Here is the start and then a link if you want to read more:

Broccoli Compound DIM Could Protect Healthy Tissues

During Radiation Treatments For Cancer

 

 

A compound that comes from broccoli and cabbage could help protect healthy tissue from radiation during cancer treatment, a new study in animals suggests.

The compound, 3,3'-diindolylmethane, also known as DIM, was given to rats and mice every day for two weeks, 10 minutes after they were exposed to lethal levels of gamma ray radiation.

While all the animals not treated with DIM afterward died from the radiation, more than half of those treated with it survived 30 days after receiving radiation.

In addition, mice treated with DIM didn't lose as many white and red blood cells or platelets, which is a common problem among people receiving cancer treatments, researchers found.

"DIM has been studied as a cancer prevention agent for years, but this is the first indication that DIM can also act as a radiation protector," study researcher Eliot Rosen, M.D., Ph.D., of Georgetown Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, said in a statement. Researchers also noted that DIM has already been shown in other research to be safe in humans.

The findings are published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/10/20/broccoli-compound-radiation-protect-healthy-tissue-dim_n_4109554.html?view=print&comm_ref=false

A compound that comes from broccoli and cabbage could help protect healthy tissue from radiation during cancer treatment, a new study in animals suggests. The compound, 3,3'-diindolylmethane, also known as DIM, was given to rats and mice every day for two weeks, 10 minutes after they were exposed to lethal levels of gamma ray radiation. While all the animals not treated with DIM afterward died from the radiation, more than half of those treated with it survived 30 days after receiving radiation. In addition, mice treated with DIM didn't lose as many white and red blood cells or platelets, which is a common problem among people receiving cancer treatments, researchers found. "DIM has been studied as a cancer prevention agent for years, but this is the first indication that DIM can also act as a radiation protector," study researcher Eliot Rosen, M.D., Ph.D., of Georgetown Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, said in a statement. Researchers also noted that DIM has already been shown in other research to be safe in humans. The findings are published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

 

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